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Working with simple searches

Simple searches are one of the three types of searches you can perform from the HCP Search Console. A simple search is based solely on word matching. You can specify multiple words or phrases to search for, and you can use wildcards to find more matches. Simple searches do not support the use of metadata as search criteria.

This chapter provides instructions for performing simple searches. It explains the rules for specifying the search criteria and the options that determine whether objects are included in the search results. It also includes several examples.

Once you have the results of a simple search, you can filter and export them. You can also save the search criteria as a reusable query.

NoteWhen the metadata query engine is active, the Simple Search page is called the Simple Query page and simple searches are called simple queries.

About simple searches

Simple searches work differently depending on the active search facility:

  • While the metadata query engine is active, simple queries compare the specified text to the names of objects and, depending on how indexing is configured, the content of custom metadata that is well-formed XML.
  • While either the Data Discovery Suite search facility is active, simple searches compare the specified text to the names of objects, object content, and document titles and email subject lines where those are present in the extracted metadata.

To perform a simple search, you use the Simple Search page of the Search Console. On this page, you can type one or more separate words or phrases (called search terms) and select one of three kinds of comparison:

  • Any of these words

    returns objects that match at least one of the specified search terms.

  • All of these words

    returns objects that match every one of the specified search terms.

  • This exact phrase

    returns objects that match a single word or phrase exactly as specified, including any white space embedded in it.

You can use wildcard characters to generate more matches for your search terms. With any and all, you can also create Boolean criteria for more complex text-based searches.

Search terms

For any and all searches, you can specify any number of search terms separated by spaces. For exact searches, all the text you enter is taken as one term, including any embedded spaces. Additionally, for exact searches, any number of consecutive embedded spaces in the term equals any number of consecutive spaces in the matching text.

NoteWhen comparing search terms to object content, the active search facility treats each portion of a word split by a line break, with or without a hyphen, as a separate word

Search terms are not case sensitive.

You can perform a simple search without specifying any search terms. Such a search returns all the indexed objects in each searchable namespace.

Here are sample terms for a simple search:

executive officer

Here’s what a search with these terms returns:

  • For an any search, all objects that contain at least one occurrence of the word executive or the word officer
  • For an all search, all objects that contain at least one occurrence of the word executive and at least one occurrence of the word officer
  • For an exact search, all objects that contain at least one occurrence of executive followed by officer with white space or special characters between the two words

Metadata query engine search terms

When you perform simple queries while the metadata query engine is active, you need to specify search terms that are complete alphabetic or complete numeric values. For example, a simple query that contains the search term 2012 finds the object named Q1_2012.ppt. A simple query that contains the search term 12 does not find this object.

The metadata query engine treats strings of all-alphabetic characters and strings of all-numeric characters as search terms and treats all other characters as search term separators, both in the text you enter and in text being searched. Therefore, test123 is treated as two search terms, test and 123. Similarly, left-handed is treated as two separate search terms, left and handed. Therefore, an any search for test matches test123 and an any search for left matches left-handed.

The metadata query engine treats multiple strings that contains all-alphabetic characters as multiple search terms. If multiple strings are enclosed inside brackets and those strings are separated by any special characters, these special characters will be used as search term separators. For example, the term (left-handed) inside brackets, is treated as two search terms - left and handed.

The search string (left-handed) matches these strings:

  • Both words left and handed.
  • Either word left or handed.

Examples that match these strings:

left-xxxx
left xxxx
xxxx-left
xxxx left
handed-xxxx
handed xxxx
xxxx-handed
xxxx handed
left xxx handed

Examples that does not match these strings:

lefth andled
lef thanded
lefth-andled
lef-thanded

The metadata query engine treats any text that is inside double quotes as a phrase. A phrase is separated into a sequence of terms based on all-alphabetic or all-numeric words that are separated either by white spaces or special characters. The resulting query will match only if the search text has the same terms in the same order and number of occurrences as in the search phrase. For example, the search string "left-handed" is treated as a phrase because it is inside double quotes.

The search string "left-then-right" matches these strings:

  • Both words left then and right.
  • All words left, then, and right.
  • All words right, then left, and then right.

The search string "left-then-right" does not match these strings:

  • Both words leftthen and right.
  • All words right and thenleft.

The metadata query engine treats only first string if the search string contain spaces or any special characters and the entire query string is not inside double quotes. For example, the search string left-handed is not treated as a phrase because it is not inside double quotes. In this instance, the metadata query engine looks for terms that matches only string left and ignores the string handed.

The search string left-handed matches these strings:

  • left-handed
  • left handed

The search string left-handed does not match these strings:

  • handed right
  • right handed
  • handed xxxx
  • handed-xxxx
Note
  • White space, "," and "-" are considered as special characters in a query string.
  • The xxx in the examples indicates any number of characters.
  • The above mentioned search behaviors work only if custom metadata has been ingested with Pretty Print XML (properly formatted XML).

Data Discovery Suite search facility search terms

When you search for matching text while the Data Discovery Suite search facility is active, special characters, except the asterisk (*), question mark (?), and backslash (\), are treated as spaces both in search terms and in text being searched. The Data Discovery Suite search facility ignores leading and trailing spaces and special characters.

Directory paths and object names

A search term can be any part or all of a directory path after rest or data (HCP namespaces) or fcfs_data (default namespace) with or without an object name. For example, these search terms will all return the coporate/HR/benefits_2 object:

corporate/HR
HR
HR/benefits_2
benefits_2

This search term, however, will not return the coporate/HR/benefits_2 object because it includes the rest directory:

rest/corporate/HR/benefits_2

Likewise, this search term will not return the coporate/HR/benefits_2 object because it includes the fcfs_data directory:

fcfs_data/corporate/HR/benefits_2

Multiple exact phrases

To search for any or all of two or more exact phrases, you use quoted terms in an any or all search; for example:

"executive officer" "wetland permit"

Here’s what a search like this returns:

  • For an any search, all objects that contain a least one occurrence of the phrase executive officer or the phrase wetland permit
  • For an all search, all objects that contain at least one occurrence of the phrase executive officer and at least one occurrence of the phrase wetland permit

Quotation marks are not meaningful in exact searches.

While the metadata query engine is active, you may want to use quoted terms to make your queries more precise.

Wildcards

The wildcard characters that you can use in search terms and the ways in which you can use them differ depending on the active search facility.

Wildcards with the metadata query engine

While the metadata query engine is active, you can use two wildcard characters:

  • The question mark (?), which represents a single character
  • The asterisk (*), which represents any number of consecutive printable characters, including none

With the metadata query engine, wildcard characters are valid at the end of a search term or within a search term. Wildcards are not valid at the beginning of a search term. That is, you cannot search for values that end with the text you specify. For example, the search terms in the first line below are valid; the one in the second line is not.

Valid: 201? Valid: S*day
Invalid: *day

You can use multiple wildcards in a search term. Two asterisks next to each other are treated as a single asterisk. Asterisks with characters between them are treated as separate wildcards. For example, the search term below matches the path /Conflicts.txt:

c**nflict*

Similarly, in an all query, the search term below matches any path with at least two directories preceding the object in the path:

/*/*/**

Two question marks next to each other are treated as separate wild cards. For example, the search term below does not match the path /Conflicts.txt:

c??nflict*

The question mark and asterisk characters do not function as wildcards when specified within double quotation marks (") or in an exact query.

Wildcards between text that the metadata query engine considers to be separate search terms are not valid. For example, the search string below does not match the path test1.txt because the wildcard is between an alphabetic character and a numeric character:

tes*1
Wildcards with the Data Discovery Suite search facility

While the Data Discovery Suite search facility is active, you can use the asterisk (*) as a wildcard character in a search term to represent any number of consecutive printable characters, including none. With the Data Discovery Suite search facility, the wildcard character is valid only at the end of a term. That is, you can search only for words that begin with the text you specify. For example, the search term on the first line below is valid; the terms on the second line are not.

Valid: 201*
Invalid: S*day Invalid: *day

You can use the wildcard character at the end of any or all of the terms in an any or all search. For an exact search, you can use a wildcard only if the term doesn’t include any embedded spaces. For example, the term below on the left is valid for an exact search; the one on the right is not.

Valid: principal* Invalid: principal exec*

You cannot use wildcards anywhere in quoted terms. Also, you cannot use a wildcard with a text string that has an underscore (_) anywhere in it.

Boolean criteria

You can create any and all searches that are more complex by using Boolean operations in the search criteria. To specify these operations, you use the plus and minus signs:

  • A plus sign (+) prefixed to a search term means returned objects must contain that term.
  • A minus sign (-) prefixed to a search term means returned objects cannot contain that term.

You can use plus signs and minus signs on multiple terms, with or without wildcards, and in any order. When used with a quoted term, the symbol comes before the opening quotation mark.

Boolean criteria in any searches

The table below describes how Boolean criteria work in any searches.

SymbolDescriptionExamples
Plus sign (+)Works like a logical AND. All returned objects must include the term with the plus sign.

Search terms: +chief +executiveSearch results: Objects that contain both chief AND executive

This is equivalent to an all search using the same terms without plus signs.

Search terms: +chief +executive officerSearch results: Objects that contain both chief AND executive, regardless of whether they contain officer.
Minus sign (-)Works like a logical NOT. Returned objects cannot include the term with the minus sign.Search term: -officerSearch results: Objects that do NOT contain officer
Search terms: +chief +executive -officerSearch results: Objects that contain both chief AND executive and do NOT contain officer
Search terms: chief executive -officer Search results: Objects that contain chief or executive and do NOT contain officer
Boolean criteria in all searches

The table below describes how Boolean criteria work in all searches.

SymbolDescriptionExamples
Plus sign (+)Works like a logical AND. Returned objects must include the term with the plus sign.

Search terms: +chief +executiveSearch results: Objects that contain both chief AND executive

This is equivalent to an all search with the same terms without plus signs.

Search terms: +chief +executive officerSearch results: Objects that contain chief AND executive AND officer
Minus sign (-)Works like a logical NOT. Returned objects cannot include the term with the minus sign.Search term: -officerSearch results: Objects that do NOT contain officer
Search terms: +chief +executive -officerSearch results: Objects that contain both chief AND executive and do NOT contain officer
Search terms: chief executive -officerSearch results: Objects that contain both chief AND executive and do NOT contain officer

Did you mean?

With the Data Discovery Suite search facility, if you specify a search term that’s similar to other words or phrases in the returned objects, the Search Console may suggest a different search by asking, Did you mean suggested-term? This question appears below your search specification. In it, suggested-term is a hyperlink you can click to reexecute the search with that term. For example, if you enter criteria as the term for your search, the Console may display:

GUID-8CC98481-837F-40AE-98BE-9D2BCF39D9C5-low.png

The term the Search Console suggests may differ from the search term you specified in a variety of ways, including spelling and, for multiple words, phrasing.

Examples of simple searches

Example: Search for any of four terms

To search for any of the terms Europe, accounting, report, 2011, select Any of these words as the comparison type and enter this in the text field:

Europe accounting report 2011
Example: Search for any of two wildcarded terms

To search for any terms beginning with prod or doc, select Any of these words as the comparison type and enter this in the text field:

prod* doc*

Each term is wildcarded in order to find objects in which it occurs either as a whole word or as the beginning of a word, such as in product, produces, documents, or documentation.

Example: Search for all of three terms — one wildcarded, two not

To search for both of the terms development and slides and also terms beginning with present, select All of these words as the comparison type and enter this in the text field:

development present* slides

The second term is wildcarded in order to find objects in which it occurs either as a whole word or as the beginning of a word, such as in presentation or presenter.

Example: Search for an exact multiword term

To search for the exact term chief financial officer, select This exact phrase as the comparison type and enter this in the text field:

chief financial officer
Example: Search for all of two terms — one included, one excluded

To search for image but not x-ray, select All of these words as the comparison type and enter this in the text field:

+image -''x-ray''
Example: Search for an exact object name

To search for the object named Q1_2012.pdf, select This exact phrase as the comparison type and enter this in the text field:

Q1_2012.pdf

Performing a simple search

Procedure

  1. In the Search Console, click the Simple Search tab.

    NoteWhen the metadata query engine is active, the Simple Search tab is the Simple Query tab and the Search button is the Query button.
  2. In the dropdown list on the Simple Search page, select the kind of results you want:

    • Any of these words
    • All of these words
    • This exact phrase
  3. In the text entry field, type the terms you want to search for.

  4. Click Search.

Results

The Console displays the Search Results page.
NoteWhile the Data Discovery Suite search facility is active, you need valid Data Discovery Suite credentials to search. If your credentials are invalid, the Search Console displays a user authentication error when you try to perform a search.

 

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