Skip to main content
Hitachi Vantara Knowledge

HP-UX configuration and attachment

This article describes how to configure and manage the new disk devices on an HP-UX host. Configuration of the devices should be performed by the HP-UX system administrator. Configuration requires superuser/root access to the host system. If you have questions or concerns, contact your Hitachi Vantara representative.

Storage system configuration for HP-UX operations

The storage system must be fully configured before being attached to the HP-UX host, as described in Configuring the storage system.

  • Host mode:

    The required host mode for HP-UX is 03. Do not select a host mode other than 03 for HP-UX. For a complete list of host modes for the storage system, see Host modes and host mode options. For instructions on setting the host modes, see the Provisioning Guide for the storage system.

  • Host mode options:

    You may also need to set host mode options (HMOs) to meet your operational requirements. For a complete list of HMOs for the storage system, see Host modes and host mode options. For instructions on setting the HMOs, see the Provisioning Guide for the storage system.

Configuration of the new devices on HP-UX

Configuration of the new devices requires superuser/root access to the HP-UX host system and should be performed by the HP-UX system administrator. If you have questions or concerns, please contact your Hitachi Vantara representative.

ImportantOn HP-UX 11iv3 and later, LUN 0 must be defined as the Command Console LUN (CCL), or pass-through LUN, for the remaining disk devices to be recognized. Do not unmap LUN 0.

Verifying new device recognition for HP-UX

The first step in configuring the new disk devices is to verify that the host system recognizes the new devices. The host system automatically creates a device file for each new device recognized.

The devices should be installed and formatted with the ports configured before the host system is powered on. Type the cfgmgr command to force the system to check the buses for new devices.

Procedure

  1. Log in to the HP-UX system as root.

  2. Use the ioscan -f command to display the device data. Verify that the system recognizes the newly installed devices (see the following figure). If desired, use the -C disk command option (ioscan -fnC disk) to limit the output to disk devices only.

    GUID-06E452AB-5075-4C57-80AA-469517FBF864-low.png

    This sample screen shows the following new devices recognized:

    • HITACHI OPEN-9 device: bus no. = 8/12, bus instance = 2, target ID = 6, LUN = 0, driver = sdisk
    • HITACHI OPEN-9 device: bus no. = 8/12, bus instance = 2, target ID = 6, LUN = 1, driver = sdisk
    • HITACHI 3390-3B device: bus no. = 8/12, bus instance = 2, target ID = 8, LUN = 0, driver = sdisk
    Note
    • If UNKNOWN appears as the Class type, the HP-UX system may not be configured properly. Refer to the HPE documentation or contact HPE technical support.
    • If information for unused devices remains in the system, get the system administrator’s permission to renew the device information. To renew the device information, delete the /etc/ioconfig and /stand/ioconfig files (rm command), reboot the server, and then issue the ioinit -c command. Now issue the ioscan -f command to recognize the logical devices again.
  3. Make a blank table for recording the device data (see the sample table below). The table must have nine columns for the following data: bus number, bus instance number, disk number, H/W path, driver, device type, target ID, LUN, and device file name. You will need three more columns for entering the major and minor numbers later.

    GUID-F5AC92CB-711E-444C-9182-EC7E08E8CD6A-low.png
  4. Enter the device data for each device (disk devices and raw/FX devices) in your table including the device file name. The device file name has the following structure:

    File name = cXtYdZ

    where

    • X = bus instance #
    • Y = target ID
    • Z = LUN

    The “c” stands for controller, the “t” stands for target ID, and the “d” stands for device. The SCSI target IDs are hexadecimal (0 through F) and the LUN is decimal (0 through 7).

  5. Verify that the SCSI TIDs correspond to the assigned port address for all connected ports (SCSI TID Maps for FC adapters). If so, the logical devices are recognized properly. If not:

    1. Check the AL-PA for each port using the LUN Manager software. If the same port address is set for multiple ports on the same loop (AL with HUB), all port addresses except one changed to another value, and the relationship between AL-PA and TID does not correspond to the mapping in SCSI TID Maps for FC adapters. Set a different address for each port, reboot the server, and then verify new device recognition again.

    2. If unused device information remains, the TID-to-AL-PA mapping will not correspond to the mapping in SCSI TID Maps for FC adapters. Renew the device information (see step 2 for instructions) and then verify new device recognition again.

Next steps

ImportantOn HP-UX 11iv3 and later updates, LUN 0 must be defined as the command console LUN (CCL) for the remaining disks to be recognized.

Verifying device files and the driver for HP-UX

The device files for all new devices (SCSI disk and raw/FX) should be created automatically during system startup. Each device should have a block-type device file in the /dev/dsk directory and a character-type device file in the /dev/rdsk directory. The SCSI disk devices must have both device files. Raw/FX devices only require the character-type device file.

NoteSome HP-compatible systems do not create the device files automatically. If the device files were not created automatically, follow the instructions in Creating device files manually on HP-UX to create the device files manually.

Procedure

  1. Display the block-type device files in the /dev/dsk directory using the ll command (equivalent to ls -l) with the output piped to more. Verify that there is one block-type device file for each device.

    # ll /dev/dsk | more                                            
    total 0
    brw-r-----  1 bin   sys    28 0x000000 Oct  4 11:01 c0t0d0
    brw-r-----  1 bin   sys    28 0x006000 Dec  6 15:08 c0t6d0
    brw-r-----  1 bin   sys    28 0x006100 Dec  6 15:08 c0t6d1 
  2. Use your completed device data table to verify that the block-type device file name for each device is correct.

    GUID-9C2EFEB6-BCB9-4E55-A30D-8162F88A1B7A-low.png
  3. Display the character-type device files in the /dev/rdsk directory using the ll command with the output piped to more. Verify that there is one character-type device file for each new device.

    # ll /dev/rdsk | more	
    total 0
    crw-r-----  1 bin   sys   177 0x000000 Oct  4 11:01 c0t0d0
    crw-r-----  1 bin   sys   177 0x006000 Dec  6 15:08 c0t6d0
    crw-r-----  1 bin   sys   177 0x006100 Dec  6 15:08 c0t6d1 
  4. Use your completed device data table to verify that the character-type device file name for each device is correct.

  5. After verifying the block-type and character-type device files, verify the HP-UX driver for the storage system using the ioscan -fn command.

    # ioscan -fn
    Class      I   H/W Path          Driver S/W State H/W Type  Description
    =======================================================================
    bc         0                       root   CLAIMED   BUS_NEXUS
    bc         1   8                   bc     CLAIMED   BUS_NEXUS Bus Converter
    fc         0   8/12                fcT1   CLAIMED INTERFACE HP Fibre Channel Mass Storage
    fcp        0   8/12.8              fcp    CLAIMED INTERFACE FCP Protocol Adapter
    ext_bus    2   8/12.8.0.255.0      fcpdev CLAIMED INTERFACE FCP Device Interface
    target     7   8/12.8.0.255.0.6    tgt    CLAIMED DEVICE
    disk       3   8/12.8.8.255.0.6.0  sdisk  CLAIMED DEVICE    HITACHI OPEN-9
                            /dev/dsk/c2t6d0   /dev/rdsk/c2t6d0
    disk       4   8/12.8.8.255.0.6.1  sdisk  CLAIMED DEVICE    HITACHI OPEN-9
                            /dev/dsk/c2t6d1   /dev/rdsk/c2t6d1
    disk       5   8/12.8.8.255.0.8.0  sdisk  CLAIMED DEVICE    HITACHI 3390*3B
                             /dev/dsk/c2t8d0   /dev/rdsk/c2t8d0
    :
    #
    

Creating device files manually on HP-UX

If the device files were not created automatically when the HP-UX system was restarted, issue the insf -e command in the /dev directory to instruct the HP-UX system to create the device files. After executing this command, repeat the procedure in Verifying new device recognition for HP-UX to verify new device recognition and the device files and driver.

# cd /dev
# insf -e
insf: Installing special files for mux2 instance 0 address 8/0/0
       :           :          :         :
       :           :          :         :
#

If the device files for the new devices cannot be created automatically, use the following procedure to create the device files manually.

Procedure

  1. Obtain your Device Data table on which you recorded the data for the new devices. You should have the following information for all new devices:

    • Bus number
    • Bus instance number
    • Disk number
    • Driver
    • Device type
    • Target ID
    • LUN
    GUID-9C2EFEB6-BCB9-4E55-A30D-8162F88A1B7A-low.png
  2. Build the device file name for each device, and enter the device file names into your table. Example:

    File name = cXtYdZ, where X = bus instance #, Y = target ID, Z = LUN.
  3. Build the minor number for each device, and enter the minor numbers into your table. Example:

    0xXXYZ00, where XX = bus instance #, Y = SCSI target ID, and Z = LUN.
  4. Display the driver information for the system using the lsdev command.

    GUID-B9D677D7-9F5A-479C-A10C-05CBBBA621F8-low.png

    This sample screen shows the following system information for the “sdisk” device driver:

    • Major number of driver sdisk for character-type files: 188
    • Major number of driver sdisk for block-type files: 31
  5. Enter the major numbers for the drivers into your table. You should now have all required device and driver information in the Device Data table (as shown in step 4).

  6. Create the device files for all new devices (SCSI disk and raw/FX devices) using the mknod command. Be sure to create the block-type device files in the /dev/dsk directory and the character-type device files in the /dev/rdsk directory, as shown in the following example:

    GUID-342C747D-02CB-4D2F-9D06-3443C9F183D9-low.png

    The character-type device file is required for volumes used as raw devices (for example, 3390-3A). The block-type device file is not required for raw devices. If you need to delete a device file, use the rm -i command.

Partitioning disk devices for HP-UX

The HP-UX system uses the Logical Volume Manager (LVM) to manage the disk devices on all peripheral storage devices including the storage system. Under LVM disk management, a volume group consisting of multiple disks is formed, and then the volume group is divided into logical partitions and managed as a logical volume. These procedures should be executed for all device files corresponding to the new SCSI disk devices.

CautionDo not partition the raw/FX devices (for example, 3390-3A/B/C). These volumes are not managed by LVM and do not need any further configuration after their character-type device files have been created and verified.

To partition the new SCSI disk devices for LVM operation:

This section provides general instructions and basic examples for partitioning the SCSI devices for LVM operations using UNIX commands. These instructions do not explicitly cover all LVM configuration issues. For more information about LVM configuration, see the appropriate user documentation or contact HPE technical support.

NoteIf desired, the HP-UX System Administrator Manager (SAM) can be used instead of UNIX commands to configure the SCSI disk devices.

Creating physical volumes for new disk drives for HP-UX

The first step in partitioning the new devices is to create a physical volume for each new disk device. Once the physical volumes have been created, you will be able to assign these new physical volumes to new or existing volume groups for management by LVM.

NoteDo not create physical volumes for raw/FX devices (for example, 3390-3A/B/C).

Procedure

  1. Use the pvcreate command to create the physical volume with the character-type device file as the argument. Specify the /dev/rdsk directory for the character file. You can only create one physical volume at a time.

    Example:

    # pvcreate /dev/rdsk/c2t6d0                                   
                           
    Physical volume “/dev/rdsk/c2t6d0” has been successfully created.
    # pvcreate /dev/rdsk/c2t6d1
    Physical volume “/dev/rdsk/c2t6d1” has been successfully created.
    :
    NoteDo not use the -f (force) option with the pvcreate command. This option creates a new physical volume forcibly and overwrites the existing volume.
  2. Repeat step 1 for each new disk device on the storage system.

Creating volume groups for the new physical volumes for HP-UX

After the physical volumes for the disk devices have been created, you can begin creating new volume groups for the new physical volumes as needed. If desired, you can also add any of the new physical volumes on the storage system to existing volume groups using the vgextend command. The physical volumes, which make up one volume group, can be located in the same disk system or in different disk systems.

Note
  • Do not assign the raw/FX devices (for example, OPEN-x-FXoto) to volume groups.
  • You may need to modify the HP-UX system kernel configuration (maxvgs setting) to allow more volume groups to be created (see Online device installation on HP-UX).

Procedure

  1. Use the ls command to display the existing volume groups.

    # ls /dev
    vg00
     :
    vg05
    #
  2. Use the mkdir command to create the directory for the new volume group. Choose a name for the new volume group that is different than all other group names. Do not use an existing volume group name.

    # mkdir /dev/vg06
    
    TipIf you need to delete a directory, use the rmdir command (for example, rmdir /dev/vgnn).
  3. Use the ls command to verify the new directory.

    # ls /dev
    vg00
     :
    vg06
    #
    
  4. Use the ll command to verify the minor numbers for existing group files with the output piped to grep to display only the files containing “group”.

    # ll /dev/vg* | grep group
    crw-rw-rw     1 root    root    64 0x000000 Nov 7 08:13 group                                     
    :
    # 

    In this example, the minor number of the existing group file is 00 (0x000000).

  5. Choose a minor number for the new group file in sequential order (that is, when existing volume groups are vg00-vg05 and next group name is vg06, use minor number 06 for the vg06 group file). Do not to duplicate any minor numbers.

    The minor numbers are hexadecimal (for example, the tenth minor number is 0x0a0000, not 0x100000).

  6. Use the mknod command to create the group file for the new directory. Specify the correct volume group name, major number, and minor number. The major number for all group files is 64.

    # mknod /dev/vg06/group c 64 0x060000
    :
    # 

    In this example, group name = vg06, major number of group file = 64, and minor number of new group file = 06.

    TipIf you need to delete a group file, use the rm -r command to delete the group file and the directory at the same time (for example, rm -r /dev/vgnn), and start again at step 2.
  7. Repeat steps 5 and 6 for each new volume group.

  8. Use the vgcreate command to create the volume group.

    # vgcreate /dev/vg06 /dev/dsk/c2t6d0                                      
                     
    Volume group "/dev/vg06" has been successfully created.
    Volume group configuration for /dev/vg06 has been saved in /etc/1vmconf/vg06.cof.
    # vgcreate -s 8 -e 15845 /dev/vg09 /dev/dsk/c2t7d0                      
                
    Volume group "/dev/vg09" has been successfully created.
    Volume Group configuration for /dev/vg09 has been saved in /etc/lvmconf/vg09.cof

    This example shows the creation of volume group vg06 with device c2t6d0 and the creation of volume group vg09 with LUSE device c2t7d0 (n = 18).

    For LUSE volumes with more than 17 OPEN-8/9 LDEVs (n > 18) or more than 7043 MB (OPEN 8/9*n-CVS), use the -s and -e physical extent (PE) parameters of vgcreate, as shown in the example above (PE Size = -s 8, MPE Size = -e 15845).

    For details about the PE and MPE parameters for LUSE devices, see PE and MPE parameters for LUSE devices for HP-UX.

    Tip
    • To allocate more than one physical volume to the new volume group, add the other physical volumes separated by a space (for example, vgcreate /dev/vg06 /dev/dsk/c0t6d0 /dev/dsk/c0t6d1).
    • If you need to delete a volume group, use the vgremove command (for example, vgremove /dev/vgnn). If the vgremove command does not work because the volume group is not active, use the vgexport command (for example, vgexport /dev/vgnn).
  9. Use the vgdisplay command to verify that the volume group was created correctly. The -v option displays the detailed volume group information.

    # vgdisplay /dev/vg06                                         
    --- Volume groups ---
    VG Name             /dev/vg06
    VG Write Access     read/write
    VG Status           available
    Max LV              255
    Cur LV              0
    Open LV             0
    Max PV              16
    Cur PV              1
    Act PV              1
    Max PE per PV       1016                                  
    VGDA                2
    PE Size (Mbytes)    4                                     
    Total PE            586 
    Alloc PE            0
    Free PE             586
    Total PVG           0

    For LUSE devices, verify the values displayed for Max PE per PV and PE Size (Mbytes).

PE and MPE parameters for LUSE devices for HP-UX

Device type

Physical Extent Size (PE)

Max Number of Physical Extents (MPE)

OPEN-3/8/9/E

OPEN-3*n (n= 2 to 36)

OPEN-3-CVS

OPEN-3*n-CVS (n = 2 to 36)

default

default

OPEN-8/9*n

n = 2 to 17

default

default

n = 18 8 15845

OPEN-E*n

n = 2 to 9

default

default

OPEN-L*n

n= 2 to 3

default

default

OPEN-8/9/E-CVS, OPEN-V

default

default

OPEN-8/9/E*n-CVS, OPEN-V*n

(n = 2 to 36)

70-119731(MB) x N1

8

default

119732- (MB) x N1

8 N2

N1 = [ Virtual LVI/LUN volume capacity (in MB) ] x n

N2 = ceil (N1 / PE) (ceil () means round up to next integer.)

Example: Volume capacity is 6000 MB for OPEN-9*22-CVS volume:

N1 = 6000 x 22 = 132000

N2 = ceil(132000/8) = 16500

Creating logical volumes for new disk devices for HP-UX

After you have created the new volume groups, create the logical volumes for each new disk device on the storage system.

NoteDo not create logical volumes for raw/FX devices (for example, 3390-3A/B/C).

Procedure

  1. Use the lvcreate -L command to create the logical volume, and specify the volume size and volume group for the new logical volume.

    For example, to create an OPEN-3 volume (2344 MB):
    # lvcreate -L 2344 /dev/vg06                                
                   
    Logical volume "/dev/vg06/lvol1" has been successfully created with character device "/dev/vg06/rlvol1".
    Logical volume "/dev/vg06/lvol1" has been successfully extended.
    Volume Group configuration for /dev/vg06 has been saved in /etc/1vmconf/vg06.cof.

    The HP-UX system assigns the logical volume numbers automatically (lvol1, lvol2, lvol3, …). Use the capacity values specified in Logical device types for the size parameter (for example, OPEN-3 = 2344, OPEN-V = 61432 in maximum size).

    To calculate S1 for VLL, LUSE, and VLL LUSE volumes, use the vgdisplay command to display the physical extent size (PE Size) and usable number of physical extents (Free PE) for the volume. Calculate the maximum size value (in MB) as follows:

    S1 = ( PE Size) × (Free PE)

    For example:

    # vgdisplay /dev/vg01
    
    --- Volume groups ---
    VG Name             /dev/vg01
    VG Write Access     read/write
    VG Status           available
    Max LV              255
    Cur LV              0
    Open LV             0
    Max PV              16
    Cur PV              1
    Act PV              1
    Max PE per PV       1016
    VGDA                2
    PE Size (Mbytes)    4                                        
    Total PE            586
    Alloc PE            0
    Free PE             586                                   
    Total PVG           0

    This example shows the following information for /dev/vg01:

    • Physical extent size = 4
    • Usable number of physical extents = 586

    Therefore, maximum size value = 4 × 586 = 2344

  2. Use the lvdisplay command to verify that the logical volume was created correctly. If desired, wait until all logical volumes have been created, and then use the * wildcard character with the lvdisplay command to verify all volumes at one time (for example, lvdisplay /dev/vg06/lvol*).

    Example:
    # lvdisplay /dev/vg06/lvol1                                 
    --- Logical volume ---
    LV Name                 /dev/vg06/lvol1
    VG Name                 /dev/vg06
    LV Permission           read/write
    LV Status               available/syncd
    Mirror copies           0
    Consistency Recovery    MWC
    Schedule                parallel
    LV Size (Mbytes)        2344        (7040 for OPEN-9)         
    Current LE              586         (1760 for OPEN-9)              
    Allocated PE            586         (1760 for OPEN-9)             
    Stripes                 0
    Stripe Size (Kbytes)    0
    Bad block               on
    Allocation              strict

    In this example:

    • LV Size 2344 = 586 * 4 = OPEN-3
    • LE = logical extent
    • PE= physical extent
  3. Repeat steps 1 and 2 for each logical volume to be created. You can only create one logical volume at a time, but you can verify more than one logical volume at a time.

    Tip
    • If you need to delete a logical volume, use the lvremove command (for example, lvremove /dev/vgnn/lvolx).
    • If you need to increase the size of an existing logical volume, use the lvextend command (for example, lvextend L size /dev/vgnn/lvolx).
    • If you need to decrease the size of an existing logical volume, use the lvreduce command (for example, lvreduce L size /dev/vgnn/lvolx).

Creating file systems for HP-UX

After you have created logical volumes, you are ready to create the file system for each new logical volume on the storage system. The default file system type for HP-UX version 11i is vxfs.

NoteDo not create file systems for the raw/FX devices (for example, 3390-3A/B/C).

Procedure

  1. Use the newfs command to create the file system with the logical volume as the argument.

    • Example of creating a file system (default file system, OPEN-3)

      # newfs /dev/vg06/rlvol1                                         
      newfs: /etc/default/fs is used for determining the file system type
      mkfs (vxfs): Warning -272 sector(s) in the last cylinder are not allocated.
      mkfs (vxfs): /dev/vg06/rlvol1 - 2400256 sectors in 3847 cylinders of 16 tracks, 
      2457.9MB in 241 cyl groups (16 c/g, 10.22Mb/g, 1600 i/g)
      Super block backups (for fsck -b) at:
          16,  10040,  20064,  30038,  40112,  50136,  60160,  70184,  80208,  90232,  
        ...
      2396176
      #
    • Example of creating a file system (default file system, OPEN-9)

      # newfs /dev/vg06/rlvol1                                          
      newfs: / etc/default/fs is used for determining the file system type
      mkfs (vxfs): ...
       :
      7188496, 7198520, 7208544
      #
    • Example of creating a file system (specifying the file system type)

      # newfs -F vxfs /dev/vg06/rlvol1                           
       :
      # newfs -F vxfs /dev/vg06/rlvol2
  2. Repeat step 1 for each new logical volume on the storage system.

Setting device parameters for HP-UX

When device files are created, the HP-UX system sets the IO time-out parameter to its default value of 20 seconds and the queue depth parameter to its default value of either 2 or 8. You must change these values for all new disk devices on the storage system.

NoteDo not create file systems for the raw/FX devices (for example, 3390-3A/B/C).

Setting the IO time-out parameter for HP-UX

The IO time-out parameter for the disk devices on the storage system must be set to 60 seconds.

Procedure

  1. Use the pvdisplay command to verify the current IO time-out value.

    # pvdisplay /dev/dsk/c0t6d0                       
    --- Physical volumes ---
    PV Name               /dev/dsk/c0t6d0
    VG Name               /dev/vg06
    PV Status             available
    Allocatable           yes
    VGDA                  2
    Cur LV                1
    PE Size (Mbytes)      4
    Total PE              586             
    Free PE               0
    Allocated PE          586            
    Stale PE              0
    IO Timeout (Seconds)  default  

    Shown in this example:

    • Total PE: 586 indicates OPEN-3, 1760 indicates OPEN-9
    • Allocated PE: 586 indicates OPEN-3, 1760 indicates OPEN-9
    • IO Timeout: default
  2. Use the pvchange -t command to change the IO time-out value to 60.

    # pvchange -t 60 /dev/dsk/c0t6d0                            
    Physical volume “/dev/dsk/c0t6d0” has been successfully changed.
    Volume Group configuration for /dev/vg06 has been saved in /etc/lvmconf/vg06.cof
  3. Use the pvdisplay command to verify that the new IO time-out value is 60 seconds.

    # pvdisplay /dev/dsk/c0t6d0                             
    --- Physical volumes ---
    PV Name               /dev/dsk/c0t6d0
    VG Name               /dev/vg06
    PV Status             available
     :
    Stale PE              0
    IO Timeout (Seconds)  60
  4. Repeat steps 1 through 3 for each new disk device on the storage system.

Setting the queue depth parameter for HP-UX

The HP-UX system automatically sets the queue depth to a default value of 2 or 8, depending on the installed HPE options and drivers. You must change the queue depth values for all new disk devices on the storage system. The following table lists the recommended queue depth values for the devices. You can adjust the queue depth as needed to optimize the I/O performance of the devices. For details, see Host queue depth .

Storage system Recommended queue depth settings
VSP 5000 series Target ports:
  • 2,048 per port
  • 32 per LDEV

Bidirectional ports:

  • 1,024 per port
  • 32 per LDEV
VSP G1x00, VSP F1500
  • 2,048 per port
  • 32 per LDEV
VSP
  • 2,048 per port
  • 32 per LDEV
VSP G130, G/F350, G/F370, G/F700, G/F900 Target ports:
  • 2,048 per port
  • 32 per LDEV

Universal ports:

  • 1,024 per port
  • 32 per LDEV
VSP G200, G400, G600, G800, VSP F400, F600, F800
  • 1,024 per port
  • 32 per LDEV

Using the scsictl command, you can view and change the queue depth parameter for each device one volume at a time. However, the queue depth is reset to the default value the next time the system restarts. Therefore, you must create and register a start-up script to set the queue depth for the disk devices each time the system restarts (see Queue depth start-up script for HP-UX).

NoteDo not set the queue depth for the raw/FX devices (for example, 3390-3A/B/C).

Procedure

  1. If you cannot shut down and restart the system at this time, use the scsictl command to set the queue depth for each new device. The scsictl commands to set queue depth should be registered as HP-UX start-up script for future reboot.

    # /usr/sbin/scsictl -m queue_depth=32 -a /dev/rdsk/c0t6d0
    # /usr/sbin/scsictl -m queue_depth=32 -a /dev/rdsk/c0t6d1
    # /usr/sbin/scsictl -m queue_depth=32 -a /dev/rdsk/c0t6d2	
    # /usr/sbin/scsictl -m queue_depth=32 -a /dev/rdsk/c0t6d3
     :
     :
    # /usr/sbin/scsictl -m queue_depth=32 -a /dev/rdsk/c0t8d0
  2. Check the /sbin/init.d and /sbin/rc1.d directories to see whether the script name "queue" is already used (link name Sxxxqueue or Kxxxqueue).

    # ls /sbin/init.d                                                     
    OspfMib    clean_ex   dfs        hpether    names      nis.server savecore   swconfig
    SnmpHpunix clean_tmps diagnostic iforls     ncs        pd         sendmail   syncer
     :
    clean_adm  ddfa       hparray    mrouted    nis.client rwhod      swcluster  xntpd
    
    # ls /sbin/rc1.d                                    
    K230audio       K340xntpd   K420dfs         K475rarpd       K630named      S420set_date
    K240auditing    K356vjed    K430dce         K480rdpd        K660net        S440savecore
    K250envd        K358egcd    K435OspfMib     K490gated       K700nettl      S500swap_start
    K258diagnostic  K360kks     K435SnmpHpunix  K500inetd       K770ptydaemon  S520syncer
    K270cron        K370vt      K435SnmpMib2    K510mrouted     K780syslogd
    K278pd          K380xfs     K440SnmpMaster  K570nfs.client  K900swagentd
    K280lp          K390rbootd  K450ddfa        K580nis.client  S100localmount
    K290hparray     K400iforls  K460sendmail    K590nis.server  S320hostname
    K300acct        K410ncs     K470rwhod       K600nfs.core    S400set_prvgrp

    Choose a unique name for the start-up script as follows:

    • If there is no script named "queue" and no link file named Sxxxqueue or Kxxxqueue, use the name "queue" for the new script and go to step 3.
    • If the script "queue" and the link file Sxxxqueue or Kxxxqueue exist and the script is used to set the queue depth for other previously installed storage systems, check the script file to see whether the queue depth is set to the desired number and add a line for each new disk device. If necessary, restart the HP-UX system to set the queue depth for the new volumes.
    • If the script queue and the link file Sxxxqueue or Kxxxqueue already exist and the script is not used for setting the queue depth for the storage system, use another name for the new queue-depth script for the storage system (for example, hitachi_q) and go to step 3.
      NoteIf the link Sxxxqueue and/or Kxxxqueue exists, but there is no script file named "queue", delete the link files, use the name "queue" for the new script, and go to step 3.
  3. Choose a unique 3-digit number for the link name. This number cannot be used in any other links. The link name is derived as follows: S stands for “start up script,” K stands for “kill script,” the three-digit number is unique to each link, and the script file name follows the three-digit number (for example, S890queue or S890hitachi_q).

  4. Create and register the new start-up script for the storage system (see Queue depth start-up script for HP-UX for an example).

  5. Shut down and restart the HP-UX system, so the new start-up script sets the queue depth for the disk devices to the specified value.

  6. After restarting the system or setting the queue depths manually, use the scsictl command to verify the queue depth for each disk device.

    # /usr/sbin/scsictl -a /dev/rdsk/c0t6d0                         
                                      
    immediate_report = 0; queue_depth = 32                                 
    :
    :
    # /usr/sbin/scsictl -a /dev/rdsk/c0t8d0                        
    immediate_report = 0; queue_depth = 32                                
    

Queue depth start-up script for HP-UX

The queue (or hitachi_q) start-up script sets the queue depth to 8 for all new volumes (SCSI disk devices) on the storage system each time the HP-UX system restarts. If the queue script exists for a previously installed storage system, check the script file to verify that the queue depth value is set to the desired value, and add a line for each new volume. If the script does not exist, create and register the script as shown in the example below. You can use the UNIX vi editor or other text editor to create or edit the script.

NoteFor questions about creating and registering the start-up script, refer to the UNIX and HPE user documentation, or ask your Hitachi Vantara representative for assistance.
# cp /sbin/init.d/template /sbin/init.d/queue 
# vi /sbin/init.d/queue
--------------------------file(/sbin/init.d/queue)----------------------
# !/sbin/sh
#
# @(#) $Revision: 78.1 $
# 
# NOTE:    This script is not configurable!  Any changes made to this
#          script will be overwritten when you upgrade to the next
#          release of HP-UX.
#
# WARNING: Changing this script in any way may lead to a system that
#          is unbootable.  Do not modify this script.
#
# <Insert comment about your script here>
#
# Allowed exit values:
#	0 = success; causes "OK" to show up in checklist.
#	1 = failure; causes "FAIL" to show up in checklist.
#	2 = skip; causes "N/A" to show up in the checklist.
#           Use this value if execution of this script is overridden
#	    by the use of a control variable, or if this script is not
#	    appropriate to execute for some other reason.
#       3 = reboot; causes the system to be rebooted after execution.
# Input and output:
#       stdin is redirected from /dev/null
#       stdout and stderr are redirected to the /etc/rc.log file
#       during checklist mode, or to the console in raw mode.

PATH=/usr/sbin:/usr/bin:/sbin
export PATH

# NOTE: If your script executes in run state 0 or state 1,then /usr
#      might not be available.  Do not attempt to access commands or
#      files in /usr unless your script executes in run state 2 or
#      greater.  Other file systems typically not mounted until run
#      state 2 include /var and /opt.

rval=0

# Check the exit value of a command run by this script.  If non-zero,
# the exit code is echoed to the log file and the return value of this
# script is set to indicate failure.
set_return()  {
       x=$?
       if [ $x -ne 0 ]; then
              echo "EXIT CODE: $x"
              rval=1 # script FAILed
       fi
}
# Kill the named process(es).
# $1=<search pattern for your process>

killproc()  {
       pid='ps -el | awk '( )$NF ~ /'"$1"'/) && ($4 !=mypid) && ($5 !=
mypid)  ){ print $4 }' mypid=$$ '
       if [ "X$pid" != "X" ]; then
              if kill "$pid"; then
                     echo "$1 stopped"
              else
                     rval=1
                     echo "Unable to stop $1"
              fi
       fi
}

case $1 in
'start_msg')
        # Emit a _short_ message relating to running this script with
        # the "start" argument; this message appears as part of the
        # checklist.
        echo "Setting the queue value"
        ;;
'stop_msg')
       # Emit a _short_ message relating to running this script with
       # the "stop" argument; this message appears as part of the
       # checklist.
       echo "Stopping the <specific> system"
       ;;

'start')
__________________________________________________________________
       # source the system configuration variables                |
       if [ -f /etc/rc.config ] ; then                            |
              . /etc/rc.config                                    |
       else                                                       |
              echo "ERROR: /etc/rc.config defaults file MISSING"  |
       fi                                                         |
                                                                  |
       # Check to see if this script is allowed to run...         |
       if [ "$CONTROL_VARIABLE" != 1 ]; then                      |
              rval=2                                              |
       else                                                       |
                                                                  |
       # Execute the commands to stop your system                 |
       :                                                          |
       fi                                                         |

       /usr/sbin/scsictl -m queue_depth=8 /dev/rdsk/c0t6d0
       /usr/sbin/scsictl -m queue_depth=8 /dev/rdsk/c0t6d1
       /usr/sbin/scsictl -m queue_depth=8 /dev/rdsk/c0t8d0
        :
       ;;
'stop')
       # source the system configuration variables
       if [ -f /etc/rc.config ] ; then
              . /etc/rc.config
       else
              echo "ERROR: /etc/rc.config defaults file MISSING"
       fi

       # Check to see if this script is allowed to run...
       if [ "$CONTROL_VARIABLE" != 1 ]; then
              rval=2
       else
        :
       # Execute the commands to stop your system

       fi
       ;;
*)
       echo "usage: $0 {start|stop|start_msg|stop_msg}"
       rval=1
       ;;
esac
exit $rval
--------------------------end of file(/sbin/init.d/queue)---------------------

# ls /sbin/rc1.d
K230audio       K340xntpd   K420dfs         K475rarpd       K630named      S420set_date
K240auditing    K356vjed    K430dce         K480rdpd        K660net        S440savecore
K250envd        K358egcd    K435OspfMib     K490gated       K700nettl      S500swap_start
K258diagnostic  K360kks     K435SnmpHpunix  K500inetd       K770ptydaemon  S520syncer
K270cron        K370vt      K435SnmpMib2    K510mrouted     K780syslogd
K278pd          K380xfs     K440SnmpMaster  K570nfs.client  K900swagentd
K280lp          K390rbootd  K450ddfa        K580nis.client  S100localmount
K290hparray     K400iforls  K460sendmail    K590nis.server  S320hostname
K300acct        K410ncs     K470rwhod       K600nfs.core    S400set_prvgrp

# ln -s /sbin/init.d/queue /sbin/rc1.d/S890queue

Creating mount directories for HP-UX

After you create the file systems and set the device parameters, create the mount directory for each volume. Choose a unique name for each mount directory that identifies the logical volume.

Procedure

  1. Use the mkdir command to create the mount directory with the new mount directory name as the argument.

    # mkdir /VSP-LU00                                        
    
  2. Use the ls -x command to verify the new mount directory.

    # ls –x                                                   
    VSP-LU00    bin     dev       device    etc       export
    floppy      home    hstsboof  kadb      kernel    lib
    #
    TipIf you need to delete a mount directory, use the rmdir command.
  3. Repeat steps 1 and 2 for each new device on the storage system.

Mounting and verifying file systems for HP-UX

After you have created the mount directories, mount the file system for each new logical volume and verify the file systems.

Procedure

  1. Use the mount command to mount the file system for the volume.

    # mount /dev/vg06/lvol1 /VSP-LU00                                 
             

    In this example, /dev/vg06/lvol1 is the Block-type lvol name and VSP-LU00 is the mount directory name

  2. Repeat step 1 for each new logical volume on the storage system.

  3. Use the bdf command to verify that the file systems are correct. Be sure the capacity (listed under Kbytes) is correct for each device.

    # bdf                                                            
    Filesystem          Kbytes    used   avail  %used  Mounted on
    /dev/vg00/lvol1      59797   59364       0  100%   /
     :
    /dev/vg06/lvol1    2348177       9 2113350    0%   /VSP-LU00               
    /dev/vg07/lvol1    2348177       9 2113350    0%   /VSP-LU01              
    /dev/vg08/lvol1    7052764       9 6347478    0%   /VSP-LU02   
  4. Perform basic UNIX operations, such as file creation, copying, and deletion, on each logical device to be sure the new devices on the storage system are fully operational.

    # mount /dev/vg06/lvol1 /VSP-LU00                                         
    # cd /VSP-LU00                                            
    # cp /bin/vi /VSP-LU00/vi.back1                            
    # ll                                                      
    drwxr-xr-t   2 root     root        8192 Mar 15 11:35  lost+found
    -rwxr-xr-x   1 root     sys       217088 Mar 15 11:41  vi.back1
    # cp vi.back1 vi.back2                                     
    # ll                                                       
    drwxr-xr-t   2 root     root        8192 Mar 15 11:35  lost+found
    -rwxr-xr-x   1 root     sys       217088 Mar 15 11:41  vi.back1
    -rwxr-xr-t   1 root     sys       217088 Mar 15 11:52  vi.back2
    # rm vi.back1                                              
    # rm vi.back2 
  5. If you want to unmount a file system after it has been mounted and verified, use the umount command (for example, umount /VSP-LU00).

Setting and verifying auto-mount parameters for HP-UX

The final step in configuring the storage system volumes for LVM operations is to set up and verify the auto-mount parameters for each new volume. The /etc/fstab file contains the auto-mount parameters for the logical volumes. If you do not plan to auto-mount the new devices, you can skip this section.

Procedure

  1. Edit the /etc/fstab file to add a line for each new volume (SCSI disk device) on the storage system.

    # cp -ip /etc/fstab /etc/fstab.standard         Make backup before editing.
    # vi /etc/fstab                                         Edit the file (vi shown).
    /dev/vg00/lvol1  /            vxfs   rw        0    1   # root
    /dev/vg00/lvol2  swap         ignore sw        0    0   # primary swap
     :
    /dev/vg06/lvol1  /VSP-LU00   vxfs   defaults  0    2   # VSP-LU00
    /dev/vg06/lvol2  /VSP-LU01   vxfs   defaults  0    2   # VSP-LU01
                                             	 See Auto-mount Parameters 

    Auto-mount Parameters

    Parameter # Name Enter:
    1 Device to mount

    Block-type device file name

    2 Mount point

    Mount directory name

    3 File System

    File system type (for example, vxfs)

    4 Mount options

    Usually "defaults"

    5 Enhance

    "0"

    6 File system check (fsck pass)

    Order for performing file system checks

    7 Comment

    Any comment statement

  2. After you finish editing the /etc/fstab file, reboot the HP-UX system. If you cannot reboot at this time, issue the mount -a command.

  3. Use the bdf command to verify the device file systems again.

Online device installation on HP-UX

After initial installation and configuration of the storage system, additional devices can be installed or de-installed online without having to restart the HP-UX system. This procedure should be performed by the system administrator (that is, super-user).

Use the normal disruptive device configuration procedure in the following cases:

  • Fibre: If a new fibre-channel connection is being installed. New fibre-channel connections can only be installed when the host system is powered off. New devices under existing fibre-channel ports can be installed and configured non-disruptively.
  • Maxvgs: If the maxvgs parameter needs to be changed. The procedure for changing the maxvgs value in the system kernel requires a system reboot.

Procedure

  1. Verify that the new devices on the storage system are ready to be configured. The Hitachi Vantara representative should have completed hardware installation and verified the normal status of the new devices (see Installing the storage system).

  2. Be sure that you are logged in as root.

  3. Enter the insf -e command to perform online device recognition.

    The insf -e command creates device files for the new devices on the existing fibre busses (see Creating device files manually on HP-UX).
  4. Configure the new disk devices for HP-UX operations described in HP-UX configuration and attachment. For raw/FX devices, you only need to verify the device files and driver. Do not partition or create a file system on any raw/FX device.

  5. Configure the application failover, path failover (that is, vgextend), and/or SNMP software on the HP-UX system as needed to recognize the new disk devices. For additional information about online installation and reinstallation of LUs, see the Maintenance Manual for the storage system.

Troubleshooting for HP-UX host attachment

The following table lists potential error conditions that might occur during storage system installation on an HP-UX host and provides instructions for resolving the conditions. If you cannot resolve an error condition, contact customer support.

Error condition

Recommended action

The logical devices are not recognized by the system.

Make sure the READY indicator lights on the storage system are ON.

Make sure the FC cables are correctly installed and firmly connected.

Make sure that LUSE devices are not intermixed with normal LUs on the same fibre-channel port.

Verify that LUNs are configured properly for each TID.

Run sr-probe to recheck the fibre channel for new devices.

For HP-UX 11iv3 and later, verify that LUN 0 is defined as the Command Console LUN (CCL) and mapped to the server.

A physical volume cannot be created (PVCREATE command).

Ensure the storage system devices are properly formatted.

Ensure the character-type device file exists.

Ensure the correct character-type device file name is used with pvcreate.

A volume group cannot be created (VGCREATE command).

Ensure the directory for the new volume group exists.

Ensure the control file exists.

Ensure the correct major # (64) and minor # are used with mknod.

Ensure the block-type file exists and is entered correctly with vgcreate.

Ensure the physical volume is not already allocated to another volume group.

A logical volume cannot be created (LVCREATE command).

Ensure the specified capacity is not greater than 4096 MB.

Ensure the capacity of the volume group is not less than the capacity of the partitioned logical volume.

File system cannot be created (newfs).

Ensure the character-type device file is entered correctly with newfs.

The file system is not mounted after rebooting.

Ensure the system was restarted properly.

Ensure the auto-mount information in the /etc/fstab file is correct.

The HP-UX system does not reboot properly after hard shutdown.

If the HP-UX system is powered off without executing the shutdown process, wait three minutes before restarting the HP-UX system. This allows the storage system internal time-out process to purge all queued commands so that the storage system is available (not busy) during system startup. If the HP-UX system is restarted too soon, the storage system will continue trying to process the queued commands and the HP-UX system will not reboot successfully.